Home » Arizona, Prehistoric, Aboriginal, Pioneer, Modern, Vol. 2: The Nations Youngest Commonwealth Within a Land of Ancient Culture by James H McClintock
Arizona, Prehistoric, Aboriginal, Pioneer, Modern, Vol. 2: The Nations Youngest Commonwealth Within a Land of Ancient Culture James H McClintock

Arizona, Prehistoric, Aboriginal, Pioneer, Modern, Vol. 2: The Nations Youngest Commonwealth Within a Land of Ancient Culture

James H McClintock

Published July 21st 2015
ISBN : 9781331929161
Paperback
514 pages
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Excerpt from Arizona, Prehistoric, Aboriginal, Pioneer, Modern, Vol. 2: The Nations Youngest Commonwealth Within a Land of Ancient CultureJust as the land of Arizona is unlike any other land, so was the foundation of the government of herMoreExcerpt from Arizona, Prehistoric, Aboriginal, Pioneer, Modern, Vol. 2: The Nations Youngest Commonwealth Within a Land of Ancient CultureJust as the land of Arizona is unlike any other land, so was the foundation of the government of her commonwealth. Ordinarily, governments are organized on the primary basis of population, the governing center placed in the most populous section of the new administrative unit. Very different it was here.The capital was established on the northernmost edge of white settlement. Geographically it was in the center of the new territory, a point probably considered by its founders. It was in the midst of a beautiful, forested, mountainous district, but the time was snowy midwinter. The locality was far from the main continental thoroughfare. Tucson, the only town within the territory, lay distant more than 250 miles, over a roadless, Apache-infested wilderness. Bright must have been the hopeful vision of the founders of our state.Arizona was given a separate territorial government for a number of reasons, the least of them the very manifest one of the needs of the neglected people. The Confederacy already had recognized the existence of a Territory of Arizona, though with very different area, embracing about the southern two-fifths of the present New Mexico and Arizona. This, at least, was a precedent. As a war measure it was considered advisable to have a center of federal authority thrown between the South and the Pacific Coast. But a weighty reason for organization was that a number of politicians, some of them lame ducks still in Congress (Gurley and Goodwin) wanted office and saw possibilities of fame and wealth in a far-off section whence had come reports of riches in silver and gold and which might prove another California. Not that these politicians were not a decent sort. They were that and more. They were men of sturdy character, patriotism and energy and, best of all, had faith in their mission and hope in its successful outcome.Creation of the Territory of ArizonaThe act organizing the temporary government for the Territory of Arizona was approved by the President February 24, 1863.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.