Home » Proceedings of Second Annual Convention of the North Carolina Forestry Association: Held at Raleigh, North Carolina, February 21, 1912 by J S Holmes
Proceedings of Second Annual Convention of the North Carolina Forestry Association: Held at Raleigh, North Carolina, February 21, 1912 J S Holmes

Proceedings of Second Annual Convention of the North Carolina Forestry Association: Held at Raleigh, North Carolina, February 21, 1912

J S Holmes

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331957508
Paperback
78 pages
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Excerpt from Proceedings of Second Annual Convention of the North Carolina Forestry Association: Held at Raleigh, North Carolina, February 21, 1912The Convention was called to order in the Hall of the House of Representatives at 10:45 a. m., by theMoreExcerpt from Proceedings of Second Annual Convention of the North Carolina Forestry Association: Held at Raleigh, North Carolina, February 21, 1912The Convention was called to order in the Hall of the House of Representatives at 10:45 a. m., by the President, Dr. D. H. Hill. After the opening prayer, which was offered by the Reverend A. D. Wilcox, of the Central Methodist Church, President Hill introduced Governor W. W. Ivitehin, who welcomed the delegates and visitors to Raleigh and to the Convention. The Governors address was in part as follows:Address of Welcome by Governor W. W. Kitchin.While not congratulating you on the vast numbers present, I am glad to see so many here, representing such a varied citizenship. The accomplishment of your purpose does not depend on numbers, but on the enthusiasm and interest of those present and upon the literature which will go out from this meeting and this Association, and which will no doubt be read by thousands.I am very much interested in the question of forest protection, but I realize that it is hard to get many people interested who have small forest holdings. This Association gives the opportunity to all citizens to join in the forestry movement. The net results will be beyond calculation.If there is any land blessed by nature more than another, it is the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina. People wonder why longleaf pine will not reproduce itself on the cut-over forest lands of this region as the old field pine does. There is just one reason, and that is the hog. Hogs dig down in the loose, sandy soil and devour the succulent roots of the longleaf pine, whereas the roots of the shortleaf pine, being smaller and fibrous, escape destruction. In counties where hogs are kept from the forest you find young longleaf pines, showing that these pines under favorable conditions will reproduce themselves as well as the old field pine. I am not advocating a hog or stock law, as this is a local question for each community to solve. I am not in favor of killing all the hogs, either.In the mountains of this State, where the forests are chiefly hardwoods, the underbrush and young growth, if allowed to grow up, will prevent floods and washing of the land as effectively as the old uncut forests.This question of forestry must be brought home to the average man.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.